Widening the Aperture: Nearshoring in Our ‘Near Abroad’ (an Executive Summary) – Global Americans

Widening the Aperture: Nearshoring in Our ‘Near Abroad’ (an Executive Summary) – Global Americans

Source: The Wilson Center, Latin American Program

Note: The full report, of which this is the Executive Summary, was originally published by the Latin American Program at the Wilson Center, a U.S.-based public policy institute.

To access the full report, click here.

The Biden administration’s domestic economic plans could end up harming or helping the Greater Caribbean Basin. If “Building Back Better – Buy American” becomes a call for U.S. firms to restrict overseas activities in favor of the United States, the rest of the region will be adversely affected since foreign investment and trade are key drivers of growth. Conversely, if the United States allows other Caribbean Basin countries to be eligible for components of its ambitious domestic agenda, it could simultaneously increase U.S. competitiveness and provide benefits to the region that far outweigh any traditional foreign assistance programs. Depending on their execution and scope, administration domestic plans could ameliorate or exacerbate migrant pressures on the U.S. southern border.

For compelling reasons of geopolitical interests, dense economic exchange, continuous waves of migration, proud diaspora communities, generous remittances, and cultural affinities, the destinies of the United States and the rest of the Greater Caribbean Basin are already inextricably intertwined. But conceiving of the nations of the Caribbean
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